How to Build a Strawberry Pallet Planter


strawberry-pallet-planter

Strawberries fresh from your own garden are a terrific treat during the growing season. A drawback to raising your own strawberries, though, is that their compact size means a bit of land is needed for a respectable number of plants. Their close proximity to the ground also makes them a challenge to harvest. Fortunately, this same compactness lends itself nicely to container growing. Using a multi-plant container saves space, provides easier access, and makes it a cinch to keep weeds under control. A quick and inexpensive way to provide vertical growing space for these plants is by recycling an old shipping pallet. In the accompanying video from Lovely Gardens TV, host Tanya reveals the detailed steps on how to transform a normally unsightly leftover used for transporting merchandise into a valuable addition to your garden that offers delicious rewards year after year. As the video demonstrates, a few things need to be rounded up first. At the top of the list, the pallet in question must not have the initials MB stamped on it. This would indicate that the pallet has been fumigated with methyl bromide. This chemical lingers and is toxic to strawberry plants. Instead, look for the initials HT. This means heat treatment was used to kill assorted pests and pathogens. In addition, gather together tools including a handsaw or power jigsaw, hammer, wide blade chisel, and screwdriver or power screwdriver.

Also, a couple dozen wood screw about one and a half or two inches long will be used. With everything ready, just follow these eight steps.


Step 1: Count the Number of Slats on Front Side of Pallet

Step 1

Along with having a pallet that’s chemical-free, also make sure the number of slats on the top side are evenly divisible by three. For instance, the video uses a pallet with nine slats, but six, twelve, or fifteen would also work.

Step 2: Cut the pallet into three (containing the same number of slats)

Step 2

Once the first round of cutting is complete, flip the three sections over and remove the bottom slats along with the attached spacer blocks from the middle section. On the outer sections, pry off the bottom slats running perpendicular to the top slats. Don’t throw anything away.

Step 3: Pull off Smaller Slats

Step 3

Once the first round of cutting is complete, flip the three sections over and remove the bottom slats along with the attached spacer blocks from the middle section. On the outer sections, pry off the bottom slats running perpendicular to the top slats. Don’t throw anything away.

Step 4: Remove or Hammer Down Exposed Nails

Step 4

If it’s possible, use the claw side of the hammer to pull exposed nails out. On thin pieces of wood, just hammer the nail tips enough to force up the nail heads for easy access. Otherwise, hammer them into the wood or hammer them over.

Step 5: Separate the square blocks using a chisel and a mallet

Step 5



Before going further, cut off the excess cross slat material so they’re flush with the slats on the center section. Next, use a hammer and chisel to separate small slat pieces from the wood blocks previously removed from the center section.

Step 6: Use the square blocks as feet of planter

Step 6

The chisel should cut through the nails holding the blocks to the slats. There will still be nail tips exposed, so use the hammer to beat down these potential safety hazards and obstacles to later construction when the blocks serve as feet.

Step 7: Build the Planter

Step 7

The planter box itself is created by turning the outer sections up on end with the slats facing out. With the long slats facing out, the center section serves as the planter bottom. Screws hold the bottom to the sides where heavier studs are available. Pieces of leftover slats are screwed to the side sections to form the ends.

Step 8. Attach the feet

Step 8

Finally, the saved wood blocks are attached to the bottom corners as feet. Each is secured with two screws inserted on angles so that they penetrate the slat the block sits on.



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